scripture

Stott on a Biblical Definition of Worship

In today's Worship Quote, John Stott sends us back to the basics.

THIS IS WORSHIP
This is worship. It is to seek to give to God the glory which is due to his name. Indeed, the best biblical definition of worship I know is to "glory in his holy name" (Psalm 105:3), that is, to revel in the unique wonder of who he is and has revealed himself to be. If worship is right because God is worthy of it, it is also the best of all antidotes to our own self-centredness, the most effective way to "disinfect us of egotism," as one writer put it long ago. In true worship we turn the searchlight of our mind and heart upon God and temporarily forget about our troublesome and usually intrusive selves. We marvel at the beauties and intricacies of God's creation. We "survey the wondrous cross on which the Prince of glory died."

We are taken up with God, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. Jesus taught us to do this in the Lord's Prayer, whose first three sentences focus not on our needs but on his glory, on the honouring of his name, the spread of his kingdom and the doing of his will.  Because we are normally so turned in on ourselves, we will not find this easy.  But we have to persevere, since nothing is more right or more important.

- John R. W. Stott, Christian Basics, (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1969), 119.


To learn more about Chip Stam and his Worship Quote of the Week, click below.

Best on Superior Worship

Today's WORSHIP QUOTE speaks to the constant temptation to rank one system of worship as superior to another.

SUPERIOR WORSHIP
The Scriptures include or allude to just about every approach to worship there is: organized, spontaneous, public, private, simple, complex, ornate or plain. Yet there is no comment anywhere about any one way being preferred over another. Rather, it is the spiritual condition of the worshiper that determines whether or not God is at work. This fact alone countermands the tendency to assume that if we could just find the correct or fashionably relevant system, all will be well and God will come down. This doesn't imply that we have no responsibility to make intelligent and sensitive choices or to be creative. But whatever these choices eventually are, they are incapable all by themselves of establishing the superiority of one system over another.

- Harold M. Best, Music through the Eyes of Faith (San Francisco: Harper, 1994), 146.


To learn more about Chip Stam and his Worship Quote of the Week, click below.

Boa on the Practice of Prayer

This week the WQOTW deals with personal, not corporate, worship and is taken from the Introduction to Kenneth Boa's Handbook for Prayer: Praying Scripture Back to God, (Trinity House Publishers, 1993).

THE PRACTICE OF PRAYER
Spiritual growth is impossible apart from the practice of prayer. Just as the key to enhanced relationships with other people is time spent in communication, so the key to a growing relationship with the personal God of heaven and earth is time invested in speaking to Him in prayer and listening to His voice in Scripture.

As central as these twin disciplines of prayer and Scripture are to our spiritual life, most believers in Christ are frustrated by hit-or-miss approaches to both. As a result, their time in prayer and the word can become unsatisfying, routine, and even boring. It is no surprise, then, that most people spend a minimal amount of time in either of these disciplines and fail to develop intimacy with the One for whom they were created. The problem with prayer is heightened by the fact that people often succumb either to the extreme of all form and no freedom, or the opposite extreme of all freedom and no form. The first extreme leads to a rote or impersonal approach to prayer, while the second produces an unbalanced and undisciplined prayer life that can degenerate into a litany of one 'gimme' after another.


To find out more about Chip Stam and his Worship Quote of the Week, click below.