Trinity

Stott on a Biblical Definition of Worship

In today's Worship Quote, John Stott sends us back to the basics.

THIS IS WORSHIP
This is worship. It is to seek to give to God the glory which is due to his name. Indeed, the best biblical definition of worship I know is to "glory in his holy name" (Psalm 105:3), that is, to revel in the unique wonder of who he is and has revealed himself to be. If worship is right because God is worthy of it, it is also the best of all antidotes to our own self-centredness, the most effective way to "disinfect us of egotism," as one writer put it long ago. In true worship we turn the searchlight of our mind and heart upon God and temporarily forget about our troublesome and usually intrusive selves. We marvel at the beauties and intricacies of God's creation. We "survey the wondrous cross on which the Prince of glory died."

We are taken up with God, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. Jesus taught us to do this in the Lord's Prayer, whose first three sentences focus not on our needs but on his glory, on the honouring of his name, the spread of his kingdom and the doing of his will.  Because we are normally so turned in on ourselves, we will not find this easy.  But we have to persevere, since nothing is more right or more important.

- John R. W. Stott, Christian Basics, (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1969), 119.


To learn more about Chip Stam and his Worship Quote of the Week, click below.

Webber on Divine Action in Worship

Today's Worship Quote is from Robert Webber, late theology professor at Wheaton College, in Wheaton, Illinois.

DIVINE ACTION IN WORSHIP
In worship there is divine action. In our celebration of Christ, something happens. There is an action from above: the Holy Spirit delivers Christ and the benefits of Christ's death and resurrection to the worshipers.

In other words, in worship our relationship with Christ is established, maintained, and repaired. Christ meets us in our act of celebrating his death and resurrection. In this worship encounter, the Spirit brings us the very real benefits of Christ's death - salvation, healing, comfort, hope, guidance, and assurance. Through this encounter, order and meaning come into our lives. Through worship, a right ordering of God, the world, self, and neighbor is experienced, and the worshiper receives a peace that passes understanding. Simply put, worship is an it-is-well-with-my-soul experience.

-Robert Webber, Blended Worship: Achieving Substance and Relevance in Worship, (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 1996).


To learn more about Chip Stam and his Worship Quote of the Week, click below.

Rinkart on Corporate Thanksgiving

Today's WORSHIP QUOTE comes from the very familiar hymn "Now Thank We All Our God." The poet was Martin Rinkart, a pastor in Eilenburg, Saxony in the early 17th century. He lived at time of great political strife. During the Thirty Years War his city was under siege by Swedish and Austrian armies. In 1637 a plague swept through the area and during one period of time, since he was the only surviving pastor, he was conducting some 50 funerals a day. What unbelievable hardship! And yet, in the face of all this pain and sorrow, this hymn resounds with clarity and confidence in God's providential care. It also has a great Mother's Day line.

Now thank we all our God with heart and hands and voices,
Who wondrous things hath done, in whom his world rejoices;
Who, from our mother's arms, hath blessed us on our way
With countless gifts of love, and still is ours today.

O may this bounteous God through all our life be near us,
With ever joyful hearts and blessed peace to cheer us;
And keep us in his grace and guide us when perplexed, 
And free us from all ills in this world and the next.

All praise and thanks to God the Father now be given,
The Son, and him who reigns with them in highest heaven,
The one eternal God whom earth and heaven adore;
For thus it was, is now, and shall be ever more.

I learned about the life and ministry of Martin Rinkart from the Worship Leader's Edition of The Worshiping Church, Carol Stream: Hope Publishing, 1991.


CHIP'S THOUGHTS

This is thanksgiving that comes out of a poet's understanding of eternal
values, not just immediate blessings or temporary comforts and joys. Is there
a lesson here for us?


To find out more about Chip Stam and his Worship Quote of the Week, click below.

St. Patrick's Breastplate

Today's WORSHIP QUOTE is a real oldie goldie, selected verses from "The Breastplate of St. Patrick." Of course, St. Patrick was the 5th century missionary to Ireland.

I bind unto myself today the strong name of the Trinity,
by invocation of the same, the Three in One, the One in Three.

I bind this day to me forever by power of faith Christ's incarnation,
his baptism in the Jordan river, his death on the cross for my salvation;
his bursting from the spiced tomb, his riding up the heavenly way,
his coming at the day of doom I bind unto myself today.

I bind unto myself today, the power of God to hold and lead,
His eye to watch, his might to stay, his ear to harken to my need,
the wisdom of my God to teach, his hand to guide, is shield to ward,
the Word of God to give me speech, his heavenly host to be my guard.

Christ be with me, Christ within me,
Christ behind me, Christ before me,
Christ beside me, Christ to win me;
Christ to comfort and restore me;
Christ beneath me, Christ above me,
Christ in quiet, Christ in danger,
Christ in hearts of all that love me,
Christ in mouth of friend and stranger.

I bind unto myself today the strong name of the Trinity,
by invocation of the same, the Three in One, the One in Three.
of whom all nature hath creation, eternal Father, Spirit, Word;
praise to the God of my salvation, salvation is of Christ the Lord.

-- St. Patrick, c. 430
-- paraphrase by Cecil Frances Alexander, 1889


To find out more about Chip Stam and his Worship Quote of the Week, click below.