"Your Gear Can Wait." Wisdom from an Ordination Council

Last week I sat on an ordination council for a worship student who has faithfully served his rural Baptist church in Indiana while attending Southern Seminary. His church is one of many around the seminary that views itself as a “sending” church. They take young greenhorn worship musicians and shape them into more mature spiritual shepherds. Nothing substitutes for the opportunities students have when they apply what they’ve learned in the classroom to real-time, real-life church work.

Prior to the interview, the young worship leader submitted written answers to 50 questions ranging from specific theological perspectives to philosophy of ministry and worship service methodology. The following questions were asked during the in-person council:

*Explain justification by faith.

*Explain your view of sanctification. What are the various means God uses to sanctify the believer?

*Can a person have Christ as his Savior without submitting to Him as Lord? Explain.

*What is your position on inerrancy?

*How does the Bible relate the sovereignty of God to salvation?

*What does the Bible teach about the extent of man’s depravity?

*What does Christ’s atonement accomplish?

*What is the proper use of the Old Testament Law?

*Do you believe that Jesus Christ was born of a virgin? What is the significance of your belief?

*What is your interpretation of the biblical teaching on Hell?

*Do you believe that the events described in Genesis 1-11 are factual or symbolic?

*What is the church?

By the end of our meeting the ordination council had covered these questions and more—from congregational worship languages and cultures to dealing with cantankerous church members. I could not have been more proud of our Department of Biblical Worship student who will graduate this week with his M.Div. from Southern Seminary. 

I’m recounting my experience on the ordination council because I’m overwhelmed with gratefulness. As I listened to the young worship leader answer the questions with confident humility, evidence of his rigorous study at the seminary in tandem with the shepherding experience he had developed at the church became wonderfully obvious. The Apostle Peter’s charge was beautifully displayed during the council meeting: “…make every effort to supplement your faith with virtue, and virtue with knowledge, and knowledge with self-control, and self-control with steadfastness, and steadfastness with godliness, and godliness with brotherly affection, and brotherly affection with love. For if these qualities are yours and are increasing, they keep you from being ineffective or unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.” (2 Peter 1:5-9)

I left the rural Indiana church that day encouraged by so many things, but three stand out in my mind: 

1. The pastor and the church take ordination very, very seriously.

2. Our student was incredibly well-prepared for the ordination interview. He worked hard during his time in Louisville, both in his studies at school and as a worship leader at the church. He grew theologically, musically, spiritually, and pastorally.  

3. The ordination council never lost sight of the vital role of an ordained man: being a pastor/shepherd.

While I was both thrilled and grateful to be a part of a council that explored so many vital areas of ministry, I was also reminded that pastoral ministry is primarily about shepherding and caring for people. In fact, people are the ministry. 

One of the pastors looked at my student and said, “I remember watching you work at putting all of your music and gear away at the end of the service the first few weeks of your ministry here. Do you remember what I said to you about three weeks after you started?” “Yes sir,” replied my student, “Quit messing with your gear and go shake hands with the people.” 

That’s a good word for all of us.

     


Dr. Crider is the Executive Director of the Institute for Biblical Worship and a professor of Church Music and Worship in the Department of Biblical Worship at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, KY. He also serves as Worship Pastor at LaGrange Baptist Church in LaGrange, KY.

Challenges to Think Through as a Worship Pastor

In today’s ever-changing culture, the worship ministry finds itself facing new challenges almost daily. Worship pastors are tasked with planning and executing worship services that speak the unchanging Word of God to a fluid culture. This challenge exemplifies the growing need for intentionality in ministry, since the culture seems to pivot on a dime week-by-week. Not only that, but worship pastors must be ahead of the game in thinking through issues that can and will arise in many of our situations so that they might answer their people's inevitable questions.

Here, we’ve provided a short list of questions for you to ponder to help you think through some of these issues. Our hope is that by engaging with these questions, you’ll be better equipped to serve the needs of your local congregation, whatever the context. Can you point to a biblical passage that speaks truth into each situation? Please note that many of these questions do not have concrete, neatly packaged answers and will often vary from church to church. Our goal is not to endorse one line of reasoning over another, but simply to help you think.

  1. If your church has multiple services, do band members take the Lord’s Supper each service, or just once? How would that affect their example of leadership?
  2. If your church has multiple services, do band members need to sit in the congregation and listen to the sermon every time, or just once? Is it alright for them to sit backstage during one of the service for a bit of reprieve?
  3. If your church has multiple services, do you sing the same “spontaneous” song in each service? Is the song even spontaneous at that point? If you don’t sing it, is this shorting out the other congregants from a powerful time of worship experienced by another portion of the church?
  4. Do you need hard guidelines for what makes a good song, or are you laxer in certain areas if you are desperate and looking for songs to round out your repertoire? How far will you compromise, if you do?
  5. What do you do with songs that you teach your congregation over a few weeks only to begin to realize that its not clicking with them at all? Do you keep singing it, or simply throw it out?
  6. What place do solos have in your service? What makes a solo or small ensemble performance different from a choral anthem? (Related to that, what place, if any, do instrumental solos have during the middle of congregational song?)
  7. How does social media play into your expectations for worship team members? If they post something questionable, do you sideline them? But, nobody’s perfect, right? Do you hold the nursery worker or greeter to the same standard?
  8. Are you okay with singing songs from churches with questionable theology, even if the song itself is gospel-centered and/or theologically sound?
  9. Should you use only the musicians your church has available, or are digital music production programs acceptable? Does Ableton and other looping programs ultimately create an inauthentic atmosphere, or can they meaningfully enhance worship?
  10. Is it inauthentic or culturally dishonest to recontextualize music specifically written for one style and rearrange it to another? For example, changing a black gospel song to a country-bluegrass style? Or adding a funk beat to “Come, Christians Join to Sing?” What’s the line that can’t be crossed between stylistic differences, if there is one?
  11. Is it appropriate to sing in another language if only a subsection of the congregation can speak it? Is there a way to teach non-speakers what the words mean? Can you have the congregation sing in two languages at once?

As you think through some of these questions, what are some other topics and dilemmas that come to mind? Let us know in the comments section. We’d love to hear from you so that we can think through these issues together.


Austin Collins serves as the research assistant at the Institute for Biblical Worship. He and his wife Liz currently lead worship at Harrison Hills Baptist Church in Lanesville, IN, while he pursues his Master of Divinity in Worship Leadership at Southern Seminary.

New Christmas Album Released!

"Christmas at Southern" featuring fresh arrangements of Christmas carols from Norton Hall Band, Lexington Road Band, Boyce Vocal Band, Cannons Lane Collective, and Doxology is now available! You can find this first volume of Christmas carols from the IBW on iTunes, Amazon, Spotify, Google Play Music, and other major music providers.

 Click to head over to the album page to listen to previews of each track!

Click to head over to the album page to listen to previews of each track!

Click the links below to download lead sheets of these new arrangements!

Come, Thou Long Expected Jesus - Lexington Road Band
O Come, All Ye Faithful - Norton Hall Band
What Child is This? - Doxology
Hark! The Herald Angels Sing (Christ is Born) - Boyce Vocal Band

Fortress, Refuge, and the Word of God: Luther’s Vision of Psalm 46 (Part 2)

One of the most important thing that I tell my students in my Psalms, Hymns, and Spiritual Songs class is that a good hymn should make us thirsty for Scripture, and thirsty for God. “A Mighty Fortress” certainly does so. In the class we identify scripture passages on which a hymn is based and examine how they are used. As is evident from a comparison of this hymn text with Psalm 46, Luther chose not to paraphrase the whole of that Psalm. Instead, he focused on the flood scenes in the first three verses and the cosmic battle in the latter part of the Psalm, where Yahweh shows himself victorious over the rebellious nations of the earth. Luther’s original contribution in this Psalm paraphrase is a vivid, near-cinematic depiction of the battle in which the “flood of mortal ills” and a “world with devils filled” (both lines recalling the Psalm’s opening images of rising torrents) are at war with the armies of the living God. Particularly gripping is his portraiture of the “ancient foe” and the victorious Christ. The unifying refrain found at the middle (46:7) and end (46:11) of the Psalm, “The Lord of Hosts is with us, the God of Jacob is our refuge,” resonates throughout Luther’s hymn in spirit if not in exact wording.

A New Translation

Since German is my first language, and since I grew up hearing this hymn from my parents first in German, I wanted to attempt a fresh version that might clarify a few obscure spots in the English text. The venerable 1852 English translation still sung by most American Protestants is that by Frederick H. Hedge. Incidentally, his is hardly the only translation available; there are dozens in all. The version by Scottish essayist, social commentator, and historian Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) has long been the accepted translation in England, according to the late leading hymn scholar Erik Routley, and still holds that place in many British hymnals.[1] My version appears in italics below.[2] My longer article with annotations and translation notes, “A Fresh Look at Martin Luther’s ‘A Mighty Fortress’” appears on the Southern Equip blog.

A massive fortress is our God,
A strong defense and weapon.
He alone helps in all the needs
That have us overtaken.
Our ancient, vicious foe
Aims to seek and destroy,
And armed with might and lies,
He wars and terrifies,
And none on earth can match him.

In our own pow’r we’d only fail,
We would be lost forever.
But fighting for us is the Man
Whom God Himself has chosen.
You ask who that might be? 
There is no God but He −
Christ Jesus is His name,
Captain of heaven’s hosts,
And He will hold the field.

And though this world were full of fiends
All trying to devour us,
We know we do not have to fear,
Our God will still empow’r us.
The ruler of this world, 
However much he roars,
Can do our souls no harm;
He is already judged,
One word of God condemns him.

That Word no powers of hell can touch,
It stands, though demons swarm us.
God with His Spirit surrounds His church,
With holy gifts He arms us.
Though men may take our lives,
goods, honor, children, wives,
Nothing will they have won,
His kingdom still will stand;
It must endure forever.

--translation E.R. Crookshank, 2017

[1] Erik Routley, Panorama of Christian Hymnody, expanded and edited by Paul A. Richardson (Chicago: GIA Publications, 2005), 288. For Carlyle’s full text see “A safe stronghold our God is still,” https://hymnary.org/text/a_safe_stronghold_our_god_is_still, accessed October 26, 2017, 3:20 p.m. This is the comprehensive, scholarly online resource for texts, tunes, and biographical and publication information.
[2] While not a perfect singing translation, I preserved the German line meter nearly throughout.


Dr. Esther Crookshank is a Professor of Church Music at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, KY. She teaches in the areas of hymnology, musicology, applied ethnomusicology, and musical aesthetics.

New Lexington Road Album Released!

"Awake My Soul" is now available!

The latest from Lexington Road Band is now available on iTunes, Amazon, Spotify, Google Play Music, and other major music providers.

  Click to view in iTunes.

Click to view in iTunes.

The new album features new takes on the classic hymns "To God Be the Glory" and "Nothing by the Blood" as well as fresh arrangements on the modern "Man of Sorrows" and "Come Behold the Wondrous Mystery." Also featured is the title track "Awake My Soul," a new song by Matthew Carpenter based upon an Isaac Watts devotional text.

You can preview the tracks "To God Be the Glory" and "Awake My Soul" over on our new Lexington Road Band page here.

Grab your copy today and help spread the word! Be sure to tell us what you think of the album in the comments below.